Are you in crisis? Call 800-273-8255 or text TALK to 741741. In immediate danger? Call 911

The Rhode Island Socioecological Model

Home 5 About Suicide Prevention 5 The Rhode Island Socioecological Model

We prevent suicide by increasing protective factors and decreasing risk factors. Looking at the model, you can see how positive things–such as a good relationship with your doctor, restrictions on lethal means, and a healthy school environment–would contribute to a lowered risk of suicide. Or, how the more challenges a person experiences in their life and environment, such as substance abuse, violent relationships, and barriers to accessing mental healthcare, might put them at higher risk for suicide.

Socioecological Model

(This graphic is based on a graphic in the 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention: Goals and Objectives for Action: A Report of the U.S. Surgeon General and of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention.)

Socioecological Model

(This graphic is based on a graphic in the 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention: Goals and Objectives for Action: A Report of the U.S. Surgeon General and of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention.)

Protective factors

Societal Protective factors

Available physical and mental healthcare
Restricted access to lethal means of suicide (e.g. locking up guns or medications)
Community
Safe and supportive schools and communities
Ongoing care after being hospitalized for mental health reasons

Relationship Protective factors

Being connected to friends, family, and community
Good relationships with healthcare providers

Individual Protective factors

Coping and problem-solving skills
Reasons for living (e.g. children in the home)
A belief that suicide is wrong

Risk Factors

Societal Risk Factors

Easy access to lethal means of suicide
Media, like TV or movies, that show suicide as easy or romantic

Community Risk Factors

Schools and communities are not safe or supportive
Hard to access healthcare (e.g. expensive medication; no therapists near home)

Relationship Risk Factors

Unhealthy or violent relationships
Family history of suicide

Individual Risk Factors

Mental health concerns
Alcohol or drug abuse
Past suicide attempt
Impulsive behavior
Aggressive behavior